Why ‘GoodFood’ came to Romania

I found out today that Romanian food is disgusting. Or at least I was told so. I’m not that much into Romanian dishes either, but I definitely disagree with such a statement. It came from a wise, impressive man, who tried to make a joke, I suppose, about how “GoodFood” magazine came to Romania. He said he tasted some jelly thing – I didn’t exactly understand – possibly pork jelly meaning “Piftie” or else I have no idea what he was talking about. There are several issues to be discussed here from mentalities and culture to personal taste, but that’s another story. I’m just talking on the surface of a day.

Of course, de gustibus non est disputandum, but you can’t judge a book by its cover either, right? So, I think it would be better to keep the joke on a local level next time and not generalise it on the whole national cuisine. I bet he’d never thought there could be a Romanian student in that big class room listening once again to ironic jokes about Romania.
With all due respect, Mr. Brett, unless you’ve tried all the national Romanian dishes and found most of them disgusting, don’t say that might have been the reason why “GoodFood” magazine came to Romania. I’m sure it’s more than that, isn’t it?

On the other hand, the lecture was great. I found it very useful to learn about the 4 P: Preparation, Passion, Professionalism and Persistence. Too bad I don’t fancy cooking, not even triple tested recipes.

“1,2,3 Libya must be free!” [Video]

This was one of the slogans Libyan protesters shouted against Col Muammar Gaddafi’s regime, this afternoon in Sheffield City Centre.

About 50 people – including children and women – gathered outside the town hall to join the spiral of protests throughout nations in North Africa. The price to pay for a democratic reform in Libya seems to be a river of blood, after security forces fired on protesters in Tripoli on Sunday night.

Boosted by Egypt revolts, Libyans believe now it’s the right time for a change. On the other hand, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi – who has led since 1969 – and his son Saif al-Islam would rather start a civil war than surrender to the opposition.

During the demonstrations in Sheffield, the Libyan protesters stopped to pray at 2pm.

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